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Nasreen Mohamedi

“The poignant story of Mohamedi, a relatively little-known but significant artist, reveals a highly individual artistic quest, drawing on historic sources from across the world, alongside her evocative photography as an unexpected form of visual note-taking.”

SHEENA WAGSTAFF

Text/Image

Untitled, ca. 1975  Ink and graphite on paper   7 1/2” x 7 1/2”

On returning to India in the early 1960s after studying in London and Paris, Nasreen broke away from the milieu of representational art pervasive in post independence India and carved out a unique space for herself at the crest of Indian modernism. Distilling her perceptions to their essence, her means to the essential, un-tethered she floated, above and away from any categorization. Extracting the structure within nature and unleashing the poetry residing within structure, Mohamedi strove to create a unity through form between the outside and the inside. The waves in the sea, the sand under the waves, the sun over the sea, in Mohamedi’s drawings they are all on a single plane, interconnected, and susceptible to the gentle variance of the viewer’s perception.

Mohamedi, employing pen and pencil, transformed sheets of paper into a tour de force. Remarkably executed over three decades ago in an environment where narrative and figurative art was the rule, Mohamedi’s clarity of pursuit and resolve is matched only by the taut tensile energy resonating through the lines. Dismantling the rigidity of the grid, she infuses them with a dynamic rhythm that at times soars, dives, expands, and collapses. Like the footsteps of sunlight through a courtyard or wind sweeping over water, they are abstract in form but not in experience. Her drawings suggest the magnanimous yet simple phenomenon so truly that they infuse an awe-inspiring chill as to the immensity of our experience and the poverty of means used to elicit it.

“There will never be anyone like Nasreen again in the Indian art world. There will be geniuses and transgressive rebels, but none so noble.”

Geeta Kapur

Text/Image

Nasreen Mohamedi had a parallel practice in Photography, though rarely exhibited in her lifetime her commitment to the medium has been revealing with surprises and wonder since the first exhibition devoted to her photographs at Talwar, NY in 2003. Employing the medium, Mohamedi distilled the structure and order around her to an essence, of form. The Photographs are sited in simple encounters of the tangible, pared down to light and dark, seeming to reveal universal truths beyond the logical. Intensely personal, and as controlled as the gaze of the artist, they reach outside the self, to perceive and connect.

Mohamedi has been the subject of solo exhibitions at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (MET Breuer), New York (2016); Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain (2015); Tate, Liverpool, UK (2014); Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, India (2013) and The Drawing Center, New York (2005).

Mohamedi’s works have also been on view at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York, NY; Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, Australia; Documenta XII, Kassel, Germany; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA; Harvard University Art Museum, Cambridge, MA; Institute of Arab and Islamic Art, NY; Fotomuseum, Winterthur, Switzerland; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; Philadelphia Museum of Art, PA; Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas City, MO; and Whitechapel Gallery, London.  

Currently her works are on view in “Elles font l’abstraction” at Centre Pompidou, Paris and travel to Guggenheim Bilbao Museum.

Quotes

Untitled, ca. 1975  Black and white photograph  10.6″ x 14.8″

 

 

 

″… Mohamedi was a great artist. She was increasingly audacious in her experimentations with space.... Her work took on a new intensity, suggestive of movement and spirit, and an almost transcendent idea of pure vision.”

THE BOSTON GLOBE

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Untitled, ca. 1975  Ink on paper  19 1/4” x 19 1/4”

 

 

 

 

“[Mohamedi’s] works of astonishing subtlety, faintly traced pencil drawings that have both architectural and musical overtones. Small deviations from perfect regularity set up cascading patterns, as if an Agnes Martin painting began pulsing like the ripples on the surface of a pond."

THE WASHINGTON POST

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Untitled, ca. 1980s  Ink and graphite on paper  22.28" x 28.38"

 

 

 

 

“...Exquisite yet robust photographs and drawings by Nasreen Mohamedi. Some float on the page like a gossamer veil. They are infused with the rhythm of a Bridget Riley, the playfulness of Piet Mondrian and the lyricism of an Ellsworth Kelly line leaf drawing...”

APOLLO

 

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Nasreen Mohamedi | Diary Entry - 18th July, 1969 London

 

 

 

 

“Nasreen Mohamedi, whose extraordinary works bespeak a combination of precision and strength, delicacy and power.”

VANITY FAIR

Selected Works

Selected Works Thumbnails

Untitled, ca. 1965
Oil on canvas  
36” x 48”

Untitled, ca. 1968
Vintage silver gelatin photograph 

8 3/4” x 12”

Untitled, 1962
Watercolor, ink and acrylic on paper 

19” x 27 3/4”

Untitled, ca. 1965
Watercolor, pastel and ink on paper 

11 1/10” x 9 1/2”

Untitled, ca. 1980s

Ink and graphite on paper

 22.28" x 28.38"

Untitled, ca. 1980

Ink and graphite on paper

19" x 27"

Untitled, ca. 1980

Ink and graphite on paper

19 1/2" x 27"

Untitled, ca. 1975

Ink and graphite on paper 

7 1/2” x 7 1/2”

Untitled, ca. 1970s

Ink and graphite on paper

7 1/2" x 7 1/2"

Untitled, ca. 1970s

Ink and graphite on paper

7 1/2" x 7 1/2"

Untitled, ca. 1970s

Ink on paper

7 1/2" x 7 1/2"

Untitled, ca. 1970s

Ink and graphite on paper

7 1/2" x 7 1/2"

Untitled, ca. 1960
Ink, graphite and watercolor on paper

13 3/5” x 19 3/10”

Untitled, ca. 1975

Black and white photograph

9.6" x 15"

Inquire

Untitled, ca. 1980
Black and white photograph

9.4″ x 11.9″

Untitled, ca. 1980

Black and white photograph

9.4″ x 11.8″

Untitled, ca. 1975

Black and white photograph

9″ x 15″

Inquire

Untitled, ca. 1975

Black and white photograph

8.8" x 14.2"

Inquire

Untitled, ca. 1975
Black and white photograph

9″ x 15″

Inquire

Untitled, ca. 1975

Black and white photograph

10" x 15"

Inquire

Untitled, ca. 1975

Black and white photograph

10.6″ x 14.8″

Untitled, ca. 1965
Oil on canvas  
36” x 48”

Untitled, ca. 1968
Vintage silver gelatin photograph 

8 3/4” x 12”

Untitled, 1962
Watercolor, ink and acrylic on paper 

19” x 27 3/4”

Untitled, ca. 1965
Watercolor, pastel and ink on paper 

11 1/10” x 9 1/2”

Untitled, ca. 1980s

Ink and graphite on paper

 22.28" x 28.38"

Untitled, ca. 1980

Ink and graphite on paper

19" x 27"

Untitled, ca. 1980

Ink and graphite on paper

19 1/2" x 27"

Untitled, ca. 1975

Ink and graphite on paper 

7 1/2” x 7 1/2”

Untitled, ca. 1970s

Ink and graphite on paper

7 1/2" x 7 1/2"

Untitled, ca. 1970s

Ink and graphite on paper

7 1/2" x 7 1/2"

Untitled, ca. 1970s

Ink on paper

7 1/2" x 7 1/2"

Untitled, ca. 1970s

Ink and graphite on paper

7 1/2" x 7 1/2"

Untitled, ca. 1960
Ink, graphite and watercolor on paper

13 3/5” x 19 3/10”

Untitled, ca. 1975

Black and white photograph

9.6" x 15"

Untitled, ca. 1980
Black and white photograph

9.4″ x 11.9″

Untitled, ca. 1980

Black and white photograph

9.4″ x 11.8″

Untitled, ca. 1975

Black and white photograph

9″ x 15″

Untitled, ca. 1975

Black and white photograph

8.8" x 14.2"

Untitled, ca. 1975
Black and white photograph

9″ x 15″

Untitled, ca. 1975

Black and white photograph

10" x 15"

Untitled, ca. 1975

Black and white photograph

10.6″ x 14.8″

ASAP Journal
ASAP Journal
Nasreen Mohamedi's Pull with Direction December 3, 2020

Nasreen Mohamedi’s works from the late 1970s—intricate monochrome lattices previously on fine display at the Met Breuer’s landmark solo in 2016—operate so powerfully in the realm of “pure” abstraction that the critic Geeta Kapur has placed her “within a great lineage of metaphysical abstraction in a way that no other [Indian] artist is.”

The New York Times
The New York Times
Nasreen Mohamedi
Art Satva
Art Satva
Nasreen Mohamedi- A Life in So(u)litude July 28, 2020

"One creates dimensions out of solitude." - Nasreen Mohamedi's diary entry, Sept. 1968

 

Galerie Magazine
Galerie Magazine
A Love Letter to the Met: Curators Share the Works They Miss the Most April 17, 2020

In 1968 the Indian artist Nasreen Mohamedi noted in her diary, ‘One creates dimensions out of solitude.’ An apt expression when most of the world finds itself in isolation, reminding me of her Untitled (circa 1970), a quiet and elusive work in which a realm of patterned, ruled lines appears to be subtly and effortlessly emerging from a gray wash...

The Kiran Nadar Museum of Art turns ten this year.  We celebrate the past decade, bringing back vignettes that will highlight the museum’s multi-focal vision, its evolving mission, directions and journeys undertaken, mapping intersecting histories of the subcontinent.

The New York Times
The New York Times
In the Art World, Globalism’s New Spin October 27, 2016

It feels like the right time to reassert global consciousness in the universe of art. Even some of New York’s large and conservative museums have been thinking this.

Art Review
Art Review
Nasreen Mohamedi October 14, 2016

The work of Nasreen Mohamedi (1937–1990) seems both a textbook example of the complex fusion of intellectual, cultural and personal experience that constitutes international Modernism, and an ideal opportunity, particularly as one of the inaugural offerings at the newly opened Met Breuer, for the Metropolitan Museum of Art to demonstrate how it might expand both the museum’s and the public’s understanding of the ‘global’, the ‘local’ and the ‘individual’.

Marg
Marg
The Elegant Complexity of Nasreen Mohamedi October 2016

These immaculate, quiet, and perfectly disciplined drawings are exercises at one level, and at another, they constitute the very proof that lines drawn with the aid of a set square, a ruler and a pair of compasses can create the premises and conditions of art.

 

Art India
Art India
Lines Eternal October 2016

Nasreen Mohamedi used the grid as a scaffolding to order her thoughts, feels Meera Menezes, as she moves through a major retrospective in New York

The MET
The MET
Of Calligraphic Lines and Radiant Light: Nasreen Mohamedi and Islamic Aesthetics June 3, 2016

"One of the inaugural exhibitions at The Met Breuer is a retrospective of Indian artist Nasreen Mohamedi (1937–1990). Organized by the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art, the exhibition spans Mohamedi's entire career, bringing together works on paper, photographs, and little-seen diaries."

Haber's Art Reviews
Haber's Art Reviews
The Met Breuer and Nasreen Mohamedi June 2016

Mohamedi’s retrospective feels like a private enclave, suiting a woman who wrote of creating art from solitude. The curators, Sheena Wagstaff with Roobina Karode of the Kiran Nadar Museum of Art in New Delhi and Manuel J. Borja-Villel of the Reina Sofia in Madrid, aim for spaces suitable to works on paper. 

The New York Times
The New York Times
Last Chance: Nasreen Mohamedi at Met Breuer May 2016

This traveling career survey of the Indian artist Nasreen Mohamedi (1937-1990) is in every way exquisite. 

Nighthawk NYC
Nighthawk NYC
Nasreen Mohamedi's "Simple" Perfection April 24, 2016

Stop the Presses.

The Boston Globe
The Boston Globe
Riveting modernism, mysticism from Nasreen Mohamedi April 21, 2016

In her art, she seems to have been released from the burden of comprehension and yielded herself up to that terrible void — which was also, say the mystics, the divine, the infinite.

Aesthetica
Aesthetica
Nasreen Mohamedi – A Philosophy in Life at Metropolitan Museum of Art April 21, 2016

The galleries on the second floor of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s brand new enterprise, The Met Breuer on Madison Avenue, devoted specifically to modern and contemporary art opened with a retrospective of the Indian artist Nasreen Mohamedi, indicating a commitment to non-Western art for the museum, and conversely securing the artist’s prominence within a global narrative of modernism.

The Seattle Times
The Seattle Times
Out-Of-The-Ordinary Project Blends Jazz, Art for a New Work April 18, 2016

Pianist Vijay Iyer has an unlikely backstory for a musician who’s been voted jazz artist of the year in Downbeat magazine’s critics’ poll, received a MacArthur Foundation genius grant, and is a professor in Harvard’s music department.

Artforum
Artforum
Critic's Pick: Nasreen Mohamedi April 2016

In her landmark essay on the grid, Rosalind Krauss outlined the form’s reductive modernist ontology, and its exemplary capacity to align the work of art with its material support.

Wall Art
Wall Art
Nasreen Mohamedi at the Met Breuer April 2016

“We are proud to present Nasreen Mohamedi in our first wave of exhibitions at The Met Breuer,” said Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO of The Met. “Mohamedi’s work calls on us to expand our understanding of graphic minimalism in a transnational context. It is a project that speaks to our interest in introducing a broad range of audiences to the innovative work created by artists across borders.”

The New York Times
The New York Times
Met Breuer: Nasreen Mohamedi April 2016

This traveling career survey of the Indian artist Nasreen Mohamedi is the smaller of the two Metropolitan Museum's two debut exhibitions in the Breuer Building, once occupied by the Whitney Museum, and it is in every way exquisite.

London Review of Books
London Review of Books
At the Met Breuer: Thoughts Made Visible March 31, 2016

When​ a beloved building goes dark, a hole opens in the urban fabric: so it was when the Whitney Museum left its old home on New York’s Upper East Side, constructed by Marcel Breuer in blunt granite and concrete in 1966.

Open Magazine
Open Magazine
The Mark of a Modernist March 28, 2016

This week, thousands of miles away from the country she called home, one of our most important but relatively less remembered artists is having a retrospective in New York City.

The New York Times
The New York Times
The 'radical' drawings of Indian artist Nasreen Mohamedi March 15, 2016

A new exhibition at the Met Breuer gallery in New York pays tribute to Mohamedi, a pioneering artist who quietly redefined South Asian modernism.

The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street Journal
Review: Nasreen Mohamedi Retrospective at the Met Breuer in New York March 15, 2016

A retiring presence in Indian art during her life, Nasreen Mohamedi is now at the center of global issues of contemporary art. 

 

Frieze
Frieze
Unfished Business at the new Met Breuer March 10, 2016

The opening of the Met Breuer signals opportunity and responsibility in equal measure 

 

The New York Times
The New York Times
A Question Still Hanging at the Met Breuer: Why? March 2, 2016

When the Metropolitan Museum of Art announced that it would be taking an eight-year lease on the Marcel Breuer building left vacant by the Whitney Museum’s move downtown, the first question everyone asked was: Why?

Financial Times
Financial Times
Curator Sheena Wagstaff on the new Met Breuer museum February 25, 2016

My whole life, I’ve entered the Metropolitan Museum the same way: up the majestic stairs, through the vaulted lobby, then right towards Ancient Egypt, left towards Greece and Rome, or straight ahead, down a hallway of ancient bric-a-brac leading back to the Middle Ages.

Financial Times
Financial Times
What to Watch out for in 2016: Nasreen Mohamedi December 28, 2015

FT writers select some of the artists, performers or events that will make their hearts beat faster

Art in America
Art in America
Philippe Vergne on Nasreen Mohamedi July 28, 2015

“I first encountered Mohamedi’s work at the Walker Art Center, when my colleague [curator] Douglas Fogle included several of her photographs in an exhibition [“The Last Picture Show: Artists Using Photography, 1960-1982,” 2003-04]. I found them extraordinary.

This epic show takes Kazimir Malevich’s radical painting of a black square – first shown in Russia 100 years ago – as the emblem of a new art and a new society. The exhibition features over 100 artists who took up its legacy, from Buenos Aires to Tehran, London to Berlin, New York to Tel Aviv. Their paintings, photographs and sculptures symbolise Modernism’s utopian aspirations and breakdowns.

Nasreen Mohamedi reveals the artist’s significant contribution to modernism that expands the boundaries of Western art history and offers an opportunity to reconsider the meaning of abstract art. Featuring more than 50 of her works, Nasreen Mohamedi charts the evolution of Mohamedi’s work, exploring how she, like Mondrian, moved away from a figurative style and developed her own unique approach to abstraction.

This exhibition brings together a group of international artists active between the 1950s and today, all of whom explore new frontiers for abstraction. The line functions in a variety of ways, including: writing, weaving, notating, diary-keeping, nature, the body, the environment, and the everyday; each resulting in expanded, eroded, and perverted grids generated by a liberating line.

Abstract Drawing is Drawing Room’s fourth artist-curated exhibition, a strand of the programme that aims to provide insight into the ideas that inform the work of key contemporary artists.

The New York Times
The New York Times
Art in Review: Nasreen Mohamedi's Becoming One January 17, 2014

In her last journal entry, she writes: “Vibrations multiply. Intensity of sweep. Undulative. Curve slowly comes to a ...,” and the writing falters, jumps, drifts off like a thread unspooling, but finally forms a closed circle. I can’t imagine seeing a more beautiful and tender gallery solo this winter.

Hyperallergic
Hyperallergic
India’s Nasreen Mohamedi Belongs to Everyone November 17, 2013

I first wrote about Mohamedi’s meticulous line drawings and abstract photographs in the Brooklyn Rail (December 2008–January 2009) and now, five years later, I found that the work has grown more powerful over time. 

NYT Magazine
NYT Magazine
Artists on Artists: William Kentridge on the Subtle Drama of the Indian Minimalist Nasreen Mohamedi October 11, 2013

The South African artist William Kentridge is best known for creating low-tech animated films, often based on charcoal drawings, that explore the painful effects of apartheid. 

The installation will juxtapose historical objects and architecture with works by contemporary artists that employ traditional Islamic styles, materials and subject matter as their source. Framed beneath the Museum’s stunning 17th century Persian mosaic arch, visitors will see how contemporary artists are drawing upon their cultural and visual past to explore personal, political, and aesthetic concerns.

Artforum
Artforum
Nasreen Mohamedi: Kiran Nadar Museum of Art May 2013

Unlike much contemporary Indian art, Mohamedi’s works feature an austere, mostly black-and-white palette and stark geometric compositions, mostly constructed through lines traced in graphite or pen and ink on paper, though at times she also captured the geometry of real-life through photography.

Financial Times
Financial Times
Nasreen Mohamedi: A View to Infinity, Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi February 8, 2013

The show shimmers with the artist’s formidable black-and-white prints that flash insights into the world around her

Mint
Mint
The Line of Control February 2013

It is not often that museums furnish us with spaces for meditative contemplation—especially when they are located in bustling shopping malls.

The exhibition Lines of Thought explores the work of 15 contemporary artists, whose practice has focused in particular on using line in creatively challenging ways. With works representing different generations, it is remarkable to observe how the meaning and use of line varies from one artist to another.

NASREEN MOHAMEDI
A. BALASUBRAMANIAM
SHEILA MAKHIJANI
ALIA SYED
RANJANI SHETTAR in

On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century

Artforum
Artforum
Nasreen Mohamedi January 2010

Housed in the airy precincts of a light-filled gallery, "Nasreen Moha­medi: Notes-Reflections on Indian Modernism" was an invitation to look and linger.

Bidoun
Bidoun
Nasreen Mohamedi Winter 2009-2010

Since her “discovery” at Documenta 12 in 2007, Nasreen Mohamedi, who passed away prematurely from Parkinson’s Disease in 1990, has swiftly become a favorite “unknown” among certain art elites.

Frieze
Frieze
Nasreen Mohamedi November-December 2009

The only dated works in the exhibition ‘Nasreen Mohamedi: Notes’ at Milton Keynes Gallery are the four pages cut from the artist’s diaries.

Art Monthly, MK Gallery
Art Monthly, MK Gallery
Nasreen Mohamedi: Notes. Reflections on Indian Modernism October 2009

MK Gallery presented a major solo exhibition of work by important Indian artist Nasreen Mohamedi.

The Guardian
The Guardian
Exhibition Preview: Nasreen Mohamedi, Milton Keynes September 18, 2009

Nasreen Mohamedi was a major, late-20th-century Indian artist who remains surprisingly under-recognised in the west. 

Milton Keynes Gallery
Milton Keynes Gallery
Nasreen Mohamedi September 5 - November 15, 2009

Milton Keynes Gallery is delighted to announce a major solo exhibition of work by important Indian artist Nasreen Mohamedi. Her diary pages, drawings and photographs combine Western influences such as Paul Klee and Kasimir Malevich with Islamic architectural forms and a South Asian sensibility, resulting in an intensely personal body of work.  

Afterall
Afterall
Making the Maximum Out of the Minimum July 2009

It is, I feel, appropriate to enlist Emily Dickinson’s poetry for my attempt to read and understand Nasreen Mohamedi’s images.

Frieze
Frieze
The Actuality of an Idea May 2009

Commercial galleries’ group shows often have the unpalatable taste of stockroom leftovers thrown together at random, less exhibitions than showroom displays, replete with sample works by all the represented artists.

Art on Paper
Art on Paper
A Detached Joy May 2009

With extreme discipline, Nasreen Mohamedi’s drawn lines seek to chart the rhythms of wind across desert sands, ocean tides, the play of shadows on outdoor stairways, or across the facades of the Islamic architecture she so admired.

Artforum
Artforum
The Actuality of an Idea April 30, 2009

A traceable evolution of tempered restraint is apparent in this multigenerational group exhibition: The oldest works are drawings that share a sense of moderation with several recent sculptures, despite the distinct physicality of the latter

Brooklyn Rail
Brooklyn Rail
Nasreen Mohamedi: The Grid Unplugged December 8, 2008

The drawings and photographs of Nasreen Mohamedi (1937-1990) are slowly but surely becoming better known to a wider American audience.

The New York Times
The New York Times
Art in Review: Nasreen Mohamedi's the grid, unplugged October 30, 2008

This show of large abstract drawings is the third New York solo of work by the Indian artist Nasreen Mohamedi (1937-90) and the most beautiful yet, which means it’s about as beautiful as gallery shows get.

The Hindu
The Hindu
Between the Lines October 2008

Using lines like the rhyme scheme of poetry, Nasreen Mohamedi created an inventive repertoire that is evocatively poignant. A representative collection of her works will be on display at the Talwar Gallery, New York, till November 15. 

Artforum
Artforum
Best of 2007 December 2007

Atsuko Tanaka, Agnes Martin, and Nasreen Mohamedi (Documenta 12, Kassel) 

Metropolis
Metropolis
Moderate Modernism: On Tagore, Le Corbusier, and Nasreen Mohamedi December 2007

Mohamedi's Modernistic Idealism

 

Flash Art
Flash Art
Documenta 12 July 2007

If one leaves Venice annoyed, if not indignant, one goes on to find oneself disoriented in Kassel. 

Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego | March 4 - July 16, 2007
Vancouver Art Gallery | October 4, 2008 - January 11, 2009

The first comprehensive exhibition to examine the international foundations and legacy of feminist art, Wack! focuses on 1965 to 1980, during which the majority of feminist activism and art-marking occurred in North America.  Comprising work in a broad range of media, the exhibition considers geography, formal concerns, and collective aesthetic and political impulses. Curated by Connie Butler. 

The Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT) is Queensland Art Gallery's flagship international contemporary art event.  The fifth APT (APT5) is the opening exhibition at the new Gallery of Modern Art-the largest gallery of modern art in Australia.  APT5 is directed by Doug Hall, and curated by the Queensland Art Gallery team: Lyne Seear, Andrew Clark, Suhanya Raffel, Julie Ewington. 

Art Asia Pacific
Art Asia Pacific
Lines among Lines October 2005

In the most intimate moment of the Drawing Center's graceful exhibition of the late East Indian artist, Nasreen Mohamedi (1937-1990), a diary page smudged with black ink, Untitled, (1978) speaks volumes about the artist's profound sensibility.

The New Yorker
The New Yorker
Nasreen Mohamedi May 23, 2005

In conjunction with its exhibition of visionary abstractions by Agnes Martin, Emma Kunz, and Hilma af Klint, the Drawing Center’s annex presents photographs and works on paper by Mohamedi (1937-90), an Indian artist rarely shown in this country.

The New York Times
The New York Times
Art in Review: Nasreen Mohamedi's Lines Among Lines May 13, 2005

Nasreen Mohamedi (1944-90) is still little known outside of India, though she is a much-admired figure there. In New York, a few of her abstract drawings have turned up in group exhibitions, and Talwar Gallery has surveyed her photographs. Now samples from both are united in this hushed but magnetic show in the Drawing Room, across the street from the Drawing Center.

Marg
Marg
Indian Photography Exhibit in New York June 2004

How does one write about the ineffable?

artUS
artUS
Nasreen Mohamedi January 2004

To anyone who has witnessed the growth of the contemporary Indian art scene in the last twenty years, the name Nasreen Mohamedi is legend. 

Asian Art News
Asian Art News
Nasreen Mohamedi at Talwar Gallery December 2003

Since one is used to seeing Asian art that is either rooted in a specific cultural context or has a strong imprint of the artist's own culture on it, Nasreen Mohamedi's black and white photographs come as a surprise because of their pure, minimalist beauty that is not tied to any particular context.

Art Critical
Art Critical
Nasreen Mohamedi December 1, 2003

The photographs of Nasreen Mohamedi are a recent supplement to the drawings of this underknown Indian artist/ photographer/ writer. Fascinating in and of themselves, these 25 silver gelatin prints are being exhibited for the first time at Talwar Gallery.

Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN | October 11, 2003 - January 11, 2004
Hammer Museum, University of California, Los Angeles, CA | February 8 - May 9, 2004
Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, Spain | May 28 - September 19, 2004
Fotomuseum Winterthur, Switzerland | November 19, 2004 - February 20, 2005
Miami Art Center, Miami, FL | March 11 - June 12, 2005

The New York Times
The New York Times
Art in Review: Nasreen Mohamedi October 10, 2003

The work of Nasreen Mohamedi (1937-1990) made an unforgettable impression in ''Out of India: Contemporary Art of the South Asian Diaspora'' at the Queens Museum of Art in 1997.